Samuel Hazo is a legend in the world of poetry, and now he brings us a novel put together with a poet’s care, each sentence honed and crafted until the craft is completely invisible.

I Want It to Happen is a romance—but much more than just a romance. The plot is simple. When Halleluiah Quinn met Tonio Vargas, they knew this was forever. But when her doctor gives her a fifty-fifty chance of survival, Halleluiah has to learn just how much forever she can pack into right now. Two completely different styles of narration weave the tale and introduce us to characters who seem to live right in front of us.

Master poet, thoughtful essayist, captain in the Marine Corps, professor, and riveting novelist, Samuel Hazo was the first Poet Laureate of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In this new novel, he tells a simple and moving love story with the wisdom of a philosopher and the urgency of a text message.

A ruthless criminal who will stop at nothing to squash the evidence against him. A beautiful woman with a mysterious secret. A doomed express train. A murdered man in a sleeping compartment. An amateur detective up on all the latest inductive methods. And a hero who looks for all the world like a murderer.

You can rely on these ingredients to produce first-rate entertainment, and you can rely on Mary Roberts Rinehart, the queen of American mystery writers, to make the best use of her ingredients.

The Man in Lower Ten at Amazon.com.

Young gentleman, have you found a perfectly innocent young lady who seems like your ideal choice for a wife? Let Mrs. Haywood show you what really goes on in the little vixen’s head.

Samuel Richardson’s Pamela gave us a scrupulously virtuous heroine who would make any sacrifice to preserve her innocence. Mrs. Haywood gives us the exact opposite of Pamela.

Or is Pamela really so different from Anti-Pamela? What lies behind that façade of virtue? Enter the sordid world of the Anti-Pamela, and learn “the Mischiefs that frequently arise from a too sudden Admiration.”

This new edition is taken faithfully from the original edition of 1741, with a new introduction by H. Albertus Boli.

“This is a true Story, of a Man Gallant enough to merit your Protection; and, had be always been so Fortunate, he had not made so Inglorious an end: The Royal Slave I had the Honour to know in my Travels to the other World; and though I had none above me in that Country, yet I wanted power to preserve this Great Man. If there be any thing that seems Romantick, I beseech your Lordship to consider, these Countries do, in all things, so far differ from ours, that they produce unconceivable Wonders; at least, they appear so to us, because New and Strange. What I have mention’d I have taken care shou’d be Truth, let the Critical Reader judge as he pleases. ’Twill be no Commendation to the Book, to assure your Lordship I writ it in a few Hours, though it may serve to Excuse some of its Faults of Connexion; for I never rested my Pen a Moment for Thought.”

From the Epistle Dedicatory

Famous wit, notorious libertine, mystery woman, spy, the ingenious Mrs. Aphra Behn may also have been the first woman in history to make her living as a professional writer. Of all her works, this romantic tragedy of the enslaved African prince is the one best known today—a tale as mysterious as the woman who wrote it. Is it a novel? Is it a true story? Or is it, as H. Albertus Boli argues in his new introduction, a mixture of both?

Oroonoko; Or, the Royal Slave, at Amazon.com.